RFC 4428 - Analysis of Generalized Multi-Protocol Label Swit(4)

时间:2006-11-02 来源: 作者: 点击:
workingandrecoveryLSP/spandisjointness(see[IPO-IMP]and [RFC4202]).Otherwise,afailureaffectingtheworkingLSP/span wouldalsopotentiallyaffecttherecoveryLSP/span;onerefersto suchaneventas"commonfailure".
  
   working and recovery LSP/span disjointness (see [IPO-IMP] and

   [RFC4202]).  Otherwise, a failure affecting the working LSP/span
   would also potentially affect the recovery LSP/span; one refers to
   such an event as "common failure".

7.4.1.  SRLG Disjointness

   A Shared Risk Link Group (SRLG) is defined as the set of links
   sharing a common risk (such as a common physical resource such as a
   fiber link or a fiber cable).  For instance, a set of links L belongs
   to the same SRLG s, if they are provisioned over the same fiber link
   f.

   The SRLG properties can be summarized as follows:

   1) A link belongs to more than one SRLG if and only if it crosses one
      of the resources covered by each of them.

   2) Two links belonging to the same SRLG can belong individually to
      (one or more) other SRLGs.

   3) The SRLG set S of an LSP is defined as the union of the individual
      SRLG s of the individual links composing this LSP.

   SRLG disjointness is also applicable to LSPs:

      The LSP SRLG disjointness concept is based on the following
      postulate: an LSP (i.e., a sequence of links and nodes) covers an
      SRLG if and only if it crosses one of the links or nodes belonging
      to that SRLG.

      Therefore, the SRLG disjointness for LSPs, can be defined as
      follows: two LSPs are disjoint with respect to an SRLG s if and
      only if they do not cover simultaneously this SRLG s.

      Whilst the SRLG disjointness for LSPs with respect to a set S of
      SRLGs, is defined as follows: two LSPs are disjoint with respect
      to a set of SRLGs S if and only if the set of SRLGs that are
      common to both LSPs is disjoint from set S.

   The impact on recovery is noticeable: SRLG disjointness is a
   necessary (but not a sufficient) condition to ensure network
   survivability.  With respect to the physical network resources, a
   working-recovery LSP/span pair must be SRLG-disjoint in case of
   dedicated recovery type.  On the other hand, in case of shared
   recovery, a group of working LSP/spans must be mutually SRLG-disjoint
   in order to allow for a (single and common) shared recovery LSP that
   is itself SRLG-disjoint from each of the working LSPs/spans.

8.  Recovery Mechanisms Analysis

   In order to provide a structured analysis of the recovery mechanisms
   detailed in the previous sections, the following dimensions can be
   considered:

   1. Fast convergence (performance): provide a mechanism that
      aggregates multiple failures (implying fast failure detection and
      correlation mechanisms) and fast recovery decision independently
      of the number of failures occurring in the optical network (also
      implying a fast failure notification).

   2. Efficiency (scalability): minimize the switching time required for
      LSP/span recovery independently of the number of LSPs/spans being
      recovered (this implies efficient failure correlation, fast
      failure notification, and time-efficient recovery mechanisms).

   3. Robustness (availability): minimize the LSP/span downtime
      independently of the underlying topology of the transport plane
      (this implies a highly responsive recovery mechanism).

   4. Resource optimization (optimality): minimize the resource
      capacity, including LSPs/spans and nodes (switching capacity),
      required for recovery purposes; this dimension can also be
      referred to as optimizing the sharing degree of the recovery
      resources.

   5. Cost optimization: provide a cost-effective recovery type/scheme.

   However, these dimensions are either outside the scope of this
   document (such as cost optimization and recovery path computational
   aspects) or mutually conflicting.  For instance, it is obvious that
   providing a 1+1 LSP protection minimizes the LSP downtime (in case of
   failure) while being non-scalable and consuming recovery resource
   without enabling any extra-traffic.

   The following sections analyze the recovery phases and mechanisms
   detailed in the previous sections with respect to the dimensions
   described above in order to assess the GMPLS protocol suite
   capabilities and applicability.  In turn, this allows the evaluation
   of the potential need for further GMPLS signaling and routing
   extensions.

8.1.  Fast Convergence (Detection/Correlation and Hold-off Time)

   Fast convergence is related to the failure management operations.  It
   refers to the time elapsed between failure detection/correlation and
   hold-off time, the point at which the recovery switching actions are
   initiated.  This point has been detailed in Section 4.

8.2.  Efficiency (Recovery Switching Time)

   In general, the more pre-assignment/pre-planning of the recovery
   LSP/span, the more rapid the recovery is.  Because protection implies
   pre-assignment (and cross-connection) of the protection resources, in
   general, protection recovers faster than restoration.

   Span restoration is likely to be slower than most span protection
   types; however this greatly depends on the efficiency of the span
   restoration signaling.  LSP restoration with pre-signaled and pre-
   selected recovery resources is likely to be faster than fully dynamic
   LSP restoration, especially because of the elimination of any
   potential crankback during the recovery LSP establishment.

   If one excludes the crankback issue, the difference between dynamic
   and pre-planned restoration depends on the restoration path
   computation and selection time.  Since computational considerations
   are outside the scope of this document, it is up to the vendor to
   determine the average and maximum path computation time in different
   scenarios and to the operator to decide whether or not dynamic
   restoration is advantageous over pre-planned schemes that depend on
   the network environment.  This difference also depends on the
   flexibility provided by pre-planned restoration versus dynamic
   restoration.  Pre-planned restoration implies a somewhat limited
   number of failure scenarios (that can be due, for instance, to local
   storage capacity limitation).  Dynamic restoration enables on-demand
   path computation based on the information received through failure
   notification message, and as such, it is more robust with respect to
   the failure scenario scope.

   Moreover, LSP segment restoration, in particular, dynamic restoration
   (i.e., no path pre-computation, so none of the recovery resource is
   pre-reserved) will generally be faster than end-to-end LSP
   restoration.  However, local LSP restoration assumes that each LSP
   segment end-point has enough computational capacity to perform this
   operation while end-to-end LSP restoration requires only that LSP
   end-points provide this path computation capability.

   Recovery time objectives for SONET/SDH protection switching (not
   including time to detect failure) are specified in [G.841] at 50 ms,
   taking into account constraints on distance, number of connections

   involved, and in the case of ring enhanced protection, number of
   nodes in the ring.  Recovery time objectives for restoration
   mechanisms have been proposed through a separate effort [RFC3386].

8.3.  Robustness

   In general, the less pre-assignment (protection)/pre-planning
   (restoration) of the recovery LSP/span, the more robust the recovery
   type or scheme is to a variety of single failures, provided that
   adequate resources are available.  Moreover, the pre-selection of the
   recovery resources gives (in the case of multiple failure scenarios)
   less flexibility than no recovery resource pre-selection.  For
   instance, if failures occur that affect two LSPs sharing a common
   link along their restoration paths, then only one of these LSPs can
   be recovered.  This occurs unless the restoration path of at least
   one of these LSPs is re-computed, or the local resource assignment is
   modified on the fly.

   In addition, recovery types and schemes with pre-planned recovery
   resources (in particular, LSP/spans for protection and LSPs for
   restoration purposes) will not be able to recover from failures that
   simultaneously affect both the working and recovery LSP/span.  Thus,
   the recovery resources should ideally be as disjoint as possible
   (with respect to link, node, and SRLG) from the working ones, so that
   any single failure event will not affect both working and recovery
   LSP/span.  In brief, working and recovery resources must be fully
   diverse in order to guarantee that a given failure will not affect
   simultaneously the working and the recovery LSP/span.  Also, the risk
   of simultaneous failure of the working and the recovery LSPs can be
   reduced.  It is reduced by computing a new recovery path whenever a
   failure occurs along one of the recovery LSPs or by computing a new
   recovery path and provision the corresponding LSP whenever a failure
   occurs along a working LSP/span.  Both methods enable the network to
   maintain the number of available recovery path constant.

   The robustness of a recovery scheme is also determined by the amount
   of pre-reserved (i.e., signaled) recovery resources within a given
   shared resource pool: as the sharing degree of recovery resources
   increases, the recovery scheme becomes less robust to multiple
   LSP/span failure occurrences.  Recovery schemes, in particular
   restoration, with pre-signaled resource reservation (with or without
   pre-selection) should be capable of reserving an adequate amount of
   resource to ensure recovery from any specific set of failure events,
   such as any single SRLG failure, any two SRLG failures, etc.

8.4.  Resource Optimization

   It is commonly admitted that sharing recovery resources provides
   network resource optimization.  Therefore, from a resource
   utilization perspective, protection schemes are often classified with
   respect to their degree of sharing recovery resources with the
   working entities.  Moreover, non-permanent bridging protection types
   allow (under normal conditions) for extra-traffic over the recovery
   resources.

   From this perspective, the following statements are true:

   1) 1+1 LSP/Span protection is the most resource-consuming protection
      type because it does not allow for any extra traffic.

   2) 1:1 LSP/span recovery requires dedicated recovery LSP/span
      allowing for extra traffic.

   3) 1:N and M:N LSP/span recovery require 1 (and M, respectively)
      recovery LSP/span (shared between the N working LSP/span) allowing
      for extra traffic.

   Obviously, 1+1 protection precludes, and 1:1 recovery does not allow
   for any recovery LSP/span sharing, whereas 1:N and M:N recovery do
   allow sharing of 1 (M, respectively) recovery LSP/spans between N
   working LSP/spans.  However, despite the fact that 1:1 LSP recovery
   precludes the sharing of the recovery LSP, the recovery schemes that
   can be built from it (e.g., (1:1)^n, see Section 5.4) do allow
   sharing of its recovery resources.  In addition, the flexibility in
   the usage of shared recovery resources (in particular, shared links)
   may be limited because of network topology restrictions, e.g., fixed
   ring topology for traditional enhanced protection schemes.

   On the other hand, when using LSP restoration with pre-signaled
   resource reservation, the amount of reserved restoration capacity is
   determined by the local bandwidth reservation policies.  In LSP
   restoration schemes with re-provisioning, a pool of spare resources
   can be defined from which all resources are selected after failure
   occurrence for the purpose of restoration path computation.  The
   degree to which restoration schemes allow sharing amongst multiple
   independent failures is then directly inferred from the size of the
   resource pool.  Moreover, in all restoration schemes, spare resources
   can be used to carry preemptible traffic (thus over preemptible
   LSP/span) when the corresponding resources have not been committed
   for LSP/span recovery purposes.

   From this, it clearly follows that less recovery resources (i.e.,
   LSP/spans and switching capacity) have to be allocated to a shared

   recovery resource pool if a greater sharing degree is allowed.  Thus,
   the network survivability level is determined by the policy that
   defines the amount of shared recovery resources and by the maximum
   sharing degree allowed for these recovery resources.

8.4.1.  Recovery Resource Sharing

   When recovery resources are shared over several LSP/Spans, the use of
   the Maximum Reservable Bandwidth, the Unreserved Bandwidth, and the
   Maximum LSP Bandwidth (see [RFC4202]) provides the information needed
   to obtain the optimization of the network resources allocated for
   shared recovery purposes.

   The Maximum Reservable Bandwidth is defined as the Maximum Link
   Bandwidth but it may be greater in case of link over-subscription.

   The Unreserved Bandwidth (at priority p) is defined as the bandwidth
   not yet reserved on a given TE link (its initial value for each
   priority p corresponds to the Maximum Reservable Bandwidth).  Last,
   the Maximum LSP Bandwidth (at priority p) is defined as the smaller
   of Unreserved Bandwidth (at priority p) and Maximum Link Bandwidth.

   Here, one generally considers a recovery resource sharing degree (or
   ratio) to globally optimize the shared recovery resource usage.  The
   distribution of the bandwidth utilization per TE link can be inferred
   from the per-priority bandwidth pre-allocation.  By using the Maximum
   LSP Bandwidth and the Maximum Reservable Bandwidth, the amount of
   (over-provisioned) resources that can be used for shared recovery
   purposes is known from the IGP.

   In order to analyze this behavior, we define the difference between
   the Maximum Reservable Bandwidth (in the present case, this value is
   greater than the Maximum Link Bandwidth) and the Maximum LSP
   Bandwidth per TE link i as the Maximum Shareable Bandwidth or
   max_R[i].  Within this quantity, the amount of bandwidth currently
   allocated for shared recovery per TE link i is defined as R[i].  Both
   quantities are expressed in terms of discrete bandwidth units (and
   thus, the Minimum LSP Bandwidth is of one bandwidth unit).

   The knowledge of this information available per TE link can be
   exploited in order to optimize the usage of the resources allocated
   per TE link for shared recovery.  If one refers to r[i] as the actual
   bandwidth per TE link i (in terms of discrete bandwidth units)
   committed for shared recovery, then the following quantity must be
   maximized over the potential TE link candidates:

        sum {i=1}^N [(R{i} - r{i})/(t{i} - b{i})]

        or equivalently: sum {i=1}^N [(R{i} - r{i})/r{i}]

        with R{i} >= 1 and r{i} >= 1 (in terms of per component
        bandwidth unit)

   In this formula, N is the total number of links traversed by a given
   LSP, t[i] the Maximum Link Bandwidth per TE link i, and b[i] the sum
   per TE link i of the bandwidth committed for working LSPs and other
   recovery LSPs (thus except "shared bandwidth" LSPs).  The quantity
   [(R{i} - r{i})/r{i}] is defined as the Shared (Recovery) Bandwidth
   Ratio per TE link i.  In addition, TE links for which R[i] reaches
   max_R[i] or for which r[i] = 0 are pruned during shared recovery path
   computation as well as TE links for which max_R[i] = r[i] that can
   simply not be shared.

   More generally, one can draw the following mapping between the
   available bandwidth at the transport and control plane level:

                                 - ---------- Max Reservable Bandwidth
                                |  -----  ^
                                |R -----  |
                                |  -----  |
                                 - -----  |max_R
                                   -----  |
   --------  TE link Capacity    - ------ | - Maximum TE Link Bandwidth
   -----                        |r -----  v
   -----     <------ b ------>   - ---------- Maximum LSP Bandwidth
   -----                           -----
   -----                           -----
   -----                           -----
   -----                           -----
   -----                           ----- <--- Minimum LSP Bandwidth
   -------- 0                      ---------- 0

   Note that the above approach does not require the flooding of any per
   LSP information or any detailed distribution of the bandwidth
   allocation per component link or individual ports or even any per-
   priority shareable recovery bandwidth information (using a dedicated
   sub-TLV).  The latter would provide the same capability as the
   already defined Maximum LSP bandwidth per-priority information.  This
   approach is referred to as a Partial (or Aggregated) Information
   Routing as described in [KODIALAM1] and [KODIALAM2].  They show that
   the difference obtained with a Full (or Complete) Information Routing
   approach (where for the whole set of working and recovery LSPs, the
   amount of bandwidth units they use per-link is known at each node and
   for each link) is clearly negligible.  The Full Information Routing

   approach is detailed in [GLI].  Note also that both approaches rely
   on the deterministic knowledge (at different degrees) of the network
   topology and resource usage status.

   Moreover, extending the GMPLS signaling capabilities can enhance the
   Partial Information Routing approach.  It is enhanced by allowing
   working-LSP-related information and, in particular, its path
   (including link and node identifiers) to be exchanged with the
   recovery LSP request.  This enables more efficient admission control
   at upstream nodes of shared recovery resources, and in particular,
   links (see Section 8.4.3).

8.4.2.  Recovery Resource Sharing and SRLG Recovery

   Resource shareability can also be maximized with respect to the
   number of times each SRLG is protected by a recovery resource (in
   particular, a shared TE link) and methods can be considered for
   avoiding contention of the shared recovery resources in case of
   single SRLG failure.  These methods enable the sharing of recovery
   resources between two (or more) recovery LSPs, if their respective
   working LSPs are mutually disjoint with respect to link, node, and
   SRLGs.  Then, a single failure does not simultaneously disrupt
   several (or at least two) working LSPs.

   For instance, [BOUILLET] shows that the Partial Information Routing
   approach can be extended to cover recovery resource shareability with
   respect to SRLG recoverability (i.e., the number of times each SRLG
   is recoverable).  By flooding this aggregated information per TE
   link, path computation and selection of SRLG-diverse recovery LSPs
   can be optimized with respect to the sharing of recovery resource
   reserved on each TE link.  This yields a performance difference of
   less than 5%, which is negligible compared to the corresponding Full
   Information Flooding approach (see [GLI]).

   For this purpose, additional extensions to [RFC4202] in support of
   path computation for shared mesh recovery have been often considered
   in the literature.  TE link attributes would include, among others,
   the current number of recovery LSPs sharing the recovery resources
   reserved on the TE link, and the current number of SRLGs recoverable
   by this amount of (shared) recovery resources reserved on the TE
   link.  The latter is equivalent to the current number of SRLGs that
   will be recovered by the recovery LSPs sharing the recovery resource
   reserved on the TE link.  Then, if explicit SRLG recoverability is
   considered, a TE link attribute would be added that includes the
   explicit list of SRLGs (recoverable by the shared recovery resource
   reserved on the TE link) and their respective shareable recovery
   bandwidths.  The latter information is equivalent to the shareable
   recovery bandwidth per SRLG (or per group of SRLGs), which implies

   that the amount of shareable bandwidth and the number of listed SRLGs
   will decrease over time.

   Compared to the case of recovery resource sharing only (regardless of
   SRLG recoverability, as described in Section 8.4.1), these additional
   TE link attributes would potentially deliver better path computation
   and selection (at a distinct ingress node) for shared mesh recovery
   purposes.  However, due to the lack of evidence of better efficiency
   and due to the complexity that such extensions would generate, they
   are not further considered in the scope of the present analysis.  For
   instance, a per-SRLG group minimum/maximum shareable recovery
   bandwidth is restricted by the length that the corresponding (sub-)
   TLV may take and thus the number of SRLGs that it can include.
   Therefore, the corresponding parameter should not be translated into
   GMPLS routing (or even signaling) protocol extensions in the form of
   TE link sub-TLV.

8.4.3.  Recovery Resource Sharing, SRLG Disjointness and Admission
        Control

   Admission control is a strict requirement to be fulfilled by nodes
   giving access to shared links.  This can be illustrated using the
   following network topology:

      A ------ C ====== D
      |        |        |
      |        |        |
      |        B        |
      |        |        |
      |        |        |
       ------- E ------ F

   Node A creates a working LSP to D (A-C-D), B creates simultaneously a
   working LSP to D (B-C-D) and a recovery LSP (B-E-F-D) to the same
   destination.  Then, A decides to create a recovery LSP to D (A-E-F-
   D), but since the C-D span carries both working LSPs, node E should
   either assign a dedicated resource for this recovery LSP or reject
   this request if the C-D span has already reached its maximum recovery
   bandwidth sharing ratio.  In the latter case, C-D span failure would
   imply that one of the working LSP would not be recoverable.

   Consequently, node E must have the required information to perform
   admission control for the recovery LSP requests it processes
   (implying for instance, that the path followed by the working LSP is
   carried with the corresponding recovery LSP request).  If node E can
   guarantee that the working LSPs (A-C-D and B-C-D) are SRLG disjoint
   over the C-D span, it may securely accept the incoming recovery LSP
   request and assign to the recovery LSPs (A-E-F-D and B-E-F-D) the

   same resources on the link E-F.  This may occur if the link E-F has
   not yet reached its maximum recovery bandwidth sharing ratio.  In
   this example, one assumes that the node failure probability is
   negligible compared to the link failure probability.

   To achieve this, the path followed by the working LSP is transported
   with the recovery LSP request and examined at each upstream node of
   potentially shareable links.  Admission control is performed using
   the interface identifiers (included in the path) to retrieve in the
   TE DataBase the list of SRLG IDs associated to each of the working
   LSP links.  If the working LSPs (A-C-D and B-C-D) have one or more
   link or SRLG ID in common (in this example, one or more SRLG id in
   common over the span C-D), node E should not assign the same resource
   over link E-F to the recovery LSPs (A-E-F-D and B-E-F-D).  Otherwise,
   one of these working LSPs would not be recoverable if C-D span
   failure occurred.

   There are some issues related to this method; the major one is the
   number of SRLG IDs that a single link can cover (more than 100, in
   complex environments).  Moreover, when using link bundles, this
   approach may generate the rejection of some recovery LSP requests.
   This occurs when the SRLG sub-TLV corresponding to a link bundle
   includes the union of the SRLG id list of all the component links
   belonging to this bundle (see [RFC4202] and [RFC4201]).

   In order to overcome this specific issue, an additional mechanism may
   consist of querying the nodes where the information would be
   available (in this case, node E would query C).  The main drawback of
   this method is that (in addition to the dedicated mechanism(s) it
   requires) it may become complex when several common nodes are
   traversed by the working LSPs.  Therefore, when using link bundles,
   solving this issue is closely related to the sequence of the recovery
------分隔线----------------------------
顶一下
(0)
0%
踩一下
(0)
0%
------分隔线----------------------------
最新评论 查看所有评论
发表评论 查看所有评论
请自觉遵守互联网相关的政策法规,严禁发布色情、暴力、反动的言论。
评价:
表情:
用户名: 密码: 验证码:
推荐内容